techken

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  1. Windows 10 Customization – EposVox http://youtube.com/eposvox (Tutorial and Walkthrough/Tour coming soon!)   INDEX: Downloads & Tools Windows Changes Third-Party Programs Theme Sources How To/Guide Windows Settings Start Menu Customization Arc Theme: Operating System? Arc Icons Dock Misc.   Downloads & Tools Windows Changes Disable Cortana, Search bar Taskbar to top of screen Combine Taskbar buttons when it is full Re-Enable Windows Photo Viewer (how) Third-Party Programs Core Temp (Temp indicator in System Tray) (video) Classic Shell (Replace Start Button) OldNewExplorer (tweak Explorer) Optional: Start is Back (Replace Start Menu outright) UxStyle (patch themes, gotta download from Google Cache) Arc Icon Replacer Nexus Dock (or Object Dock, RocketDock, etc.) 7+ Taskbar Tweaker (video) Winamp (music player) Theme Sources Noir Dock Theme Arc Theme for Windows Arc Icon Pack Edge Start Orb Obsidian Cursor (how to install cursors) Flat icons: Misc Arc Chrome Theme Arc FireFox Theme (Windows) Wallpapers – Misc. from Wallhaven Adobe CC Flat Icons   How To/Guide BEFORE YOU BEGIN! Make a system restore point!!! (how to) Windows Settings Right-Click your taskbar and go to Settings Change “Taskbar Location on Screen” to “Top” Change “Combine Taskbar Buttons” to “When Taskbar is full” Make sure the other settings match this screenshot. Right-Click your taskbar and disable Cortana and/or the search bar if you wish. Install Core Temp if you want the system tray temperature indicators. Install 7+ Taskbar Tweaker and match your settings to this screenshot if you want yours to work like mine. (More detailed tutorial) Download and run OldNewExplorer to change your explorer look and feel. (Or try a replacement like Clover (buggy as hell on Windows 10), Directory Opus, or OneCommander. NOTE: These may not mesh with the themeing well, depending on your system.) Download and un-zip your cursor. I chose Obsidian Cursor. Right-click the .inf file and click “Install.” Then open the Control Panel, search for “pointer” and click “Change how the Pointer looks and feels.” Choose your cursor from the menu and accept the prompt. (More detailed video on how to install cursors) Keep in mind: The Windows theme may change/reset your cursor. You will need to go back to this menu and choose it again after applying the theme. Reboot Re-enable Windows Photo Viewer if you prefer it to the Windows 10 “Photos” app (how) Start Menu Customization Download Classic Shell and customize the start menu to your liking, or leave it alone Replace the Start Orb with one of your choosing. I used Edge Start Orb Alternatively, Start is Back is recommended by the Arc Theme people as a simple Start Menu replacement. Arc Theme: Operating System? This step depends heavily on your operating system. Windows 7/8/8.1 – Use UltraUXThemePatcher or UxStyle Windows 10 PRE-ANNIVERSARY UPDATE Run UxStyle Patch Reboot Rename the default C:\Windows\Resources\Themes\aero\aerolite.msstyles to aerolite.msstyles.backup (you will need to take ownership of the file) (how to add “Take Ownership” to the right-click menu) Make a new folder in C:\Windows\Resources\Themes\aero\ called aerolite.msstyles Put your selected theme folder in the aerolite.msstyles folder C:\Windows\Resources\Themes\aero\aerolite.msstyles\ Select your theme from the personalization menu. More detailed instructions Windows 10 ANNIVERSARY UPDATE (an onwards) Run UxStyle Patch Reboot Copy the arc theme folder to the C:\Windows\Resources\Themes\ folder and choose it from the Personalization menu! Re-apply your cursor theme. (See above) To fix Taskbar/Start Menu/UWP App colors: Right-Click your Desktop and choose “Personalize” Click on “Colors” Pick a color to match your Windows theme. (This did not change properly for me.) Also, choose/re-apply your desired wallpapers. I use a folder of wallpapers (mostly from Wallhaven) and have it set to alternate every 10-30 minutes. The “Fill” selection makes them all fit to your monitor without stretching or black bars. Arc Icons Download and un-zip the Arc Icons pack Look at the icons and choose “Regular” or “Symbolic” Rename either “Arc-Regular.ee” or “Arc-Symbolic.ee” so that the file extension is “.exe” instead of “.ee” Double-click your .exe and run the icon patcher. (The ReadMe file has instructions for uninstallation.) Dock Download and install your dock of choice. I used Nexus Dock Customize the Dock to your liking. To change icons, right click dock item, “Dock Entry Properties” and “Change Icon.” For my icons, I just Googled “flat icon” for every program. Sub-docks/”Stacks” are a paid feature of Winstep/Nexus. I do not recommend paying for this! Try Object Dock or a Stack docklet for RocketDock instead. Misc. Apply custom Browser themes to match. I used Arc Chrome Theme and Arc FireFox Theme (Windows). You might want to enable “Dark mode” themes for Windows 10-specific menus or UWP apps. I don’t like this, I left it alone. You may want to change the colors of your Office program to match. I made the background of LibreOffice darker grey to match. The Terminal icon is for the Windows 10 Command Prompt. I use it a lot. The Ubuntu Icon is for the Bash on Ubuntu on Windows subsystem. I also use it a lot. The Linux Tux (penguin) icon is a shortcut to directly launch a Linux VirtualBox. The YouTube icon is a “stack” or sub-dock for all of my production programs.
  2. How to Install Xpenology on a PC

    The best and easy-to-use NAS OS is Synology DSM, but it officially works only on Synology Hardware (mostly ARM platforms and a few pricy X86 platforms). DSM is open source, but it needs to be modified in order to run on almost any not-very-old PC hardware. The main request is that the PC has SATA and AHCI support. A community of enthusiasts have managed to study the DSM source code and now you can use it on your PC, maybe even an old PC or a dedicated new server, with multiple HDD bays. Bootloader + Synology DSM + PC = Xpenology NAS System I will show you how to install the DMS on your PC. Before we get to this, you should know we need some prerequisites: 1. A PC with: - 64-bit capable processor (older bootloaders can be used for 32-bit processor) - SATA and AHCI mode support activated (see bios options) - Ethernet port, connected to a LAN - minimum 1 Gb RAM - another computer, in order to access and configure the new system, via LAN - a temporary monitor, until we finish the NAS configuration (or ILO access, if you have an HP Gen8 Microserver). 2. Minimum one HDD, preferably two or more, in order to have redundancy of information. 3. One USB stick (or microSD, if your PC can boot from microSD port). This medium is used only for bootloader. No information is written on it. The DSM configuration and file are written on the HDD. 4. The newest bootloader from here or here. Download the latest .IMG version of the bootloader (now it is XPEnoboot_DS3615xs_5.2-5967.1.img). 5. Download the corresponding DSM .PAT file (in this case DSM_DS3615xs_5967.pat). Do not download the updates yet! 6. Download Win32 Disk Imager. 7. Download Synology Assist for your OS (Windows/OSX/Linux) Install Xpenology A. Configure the PC by activating SATA AHCI mode (not Legacy mode) in BIOS and make it boot ALWAYS by default from USB/MicroSD device. I am currently using an HP Microserver Gen8 and I recommend this as a cheap and semi-enterprise solution for a NAS. B. Create a bootable USB/MicroSD device using Win32 Disk Imager and the .IMG bootloader file. All info on the USB/MicroSD will be deleted.     C. Use the new bootable device and start the computer. If all works well, you should see three options. Choose the third one (Upgrade/Install). D. Load Synology Assist on your main computer and let it scan the LAN for a Synology device. It will detect your NAS. Right-click on it, select Install, and use the large DSM .PAT file.         E. Choose to create an SHR Volume on the HDDs. This will delete all information on the HDDs. So please be careful!     F. Create an Administrator password After this, wait for DSM to be installed and after the NAS automatic restart, run Synology Assist again; it should detect the new NAS and should read "Installed." Right click on the listed NAS and select Connect. Use your administrator password to connect and configure your new NAS.     G. You can now manually download and apply the upgrades file, but only if you’ve checked that the upgrade is compatible with the current bootloader. For this use Xpenology forum! I recommend that you take the new Xpenology System for a spin. It has a lot of features and goodies. Once you get accustomed to the whole environment, repeat the installation process and put it into production. I use the following apps on my NAS: - Surveillance Station (comes with license for two IP cameras) - file sharing (SAMBA, NFS or Mac File service) - Plex Server (can be used as DLNA for Smart TVs without Plex client option. It's nicer if you have the Plex Client.) - Video Station (similar to Plex Server, but free client apps on IOS/Android devices) - Transmission (torrent client) - Crashplan (unlimited automatic cloud storage for just 60 USD/year) - Time Capsule for my Macs computers - Photo station (I can access my photos and share them with friends) - Cloud Station (say goodbye to Dropbox, Google Drive etc.) - Download Station (download manager on your NAS, you can control it remotely, via a browser extension). In the package center, you will find a lot of programs. If you want to have more options at your disposal, you need to add new repositories.
  3. Upgrade Windows 10 Home to Pro for Free

    what part isn't working for you 
  4. Anonymous ftp finder

    Description Anonymous FTP Scanner (AFF) is a Security tool for penetration testers, network admins etc. The tool is written in Python with wxPython as GUI and compiled with Py2exe. AFF can scan large networks for Anonymous FTP Servers and regular FTP:s. An example of Anonymous FTP Server is network equipment, Multi Function Printers (MFP:s) etc. AFF can test if Anonymous FTP access can be used to store data. For example, hackers store/hide Trojans and other hacking tools in Anonymous FTP access. Anonymous_FTP_Finder_0.1_Beta.exe
  5. Anonymous ftp finder

    ill be posting it later today sorry 
  6. What is ASICBOOST?

    What is ASICBOOST?  JP Buntinx  April 9, 2017  Education, FAQ   There has been quite a lot of controversy regarding Bitmain’s ASICBOOST technology over the past few days. This technology allows the company to use a flaw in the bitcoin mining protocol to gain a competitive advantage over their competitors. However, there are some some claims ASICBOOST only works with a specific type of scaling proposal. It is time we dive deeper into the mystery that is ASICBOOST.UNVEILING THE MYSTERY THAT IS ASICBOOSTAs most people are well aware of by now, Bitmain’s ASICBOOST technology provides them with additional mining power. To be more specific, the technology allows ASIC hardware to increase its mining efficiency by around 20%. This is achieved due to a reduction in the frequency of computing a part of the SHA-256 calculation. In a way, this is why Bitmain is “abusing” an “exploit” found in SHA-256 mining. A more technical explanation can be found here. Moreover, it is also important to note ASICBOOST technology is not something that was only discovered a few days ago. The concept has been proposed quite some time ago, and Bitmain has been transparent about how they use a modified version of the technology. This whitepaper explains ASICBOOST dates back to March of 2016, and has been drafted by Dr. Timo Hanke. Speeding up an ASIC’s hashes by approximately 20% is quite a significant development, and can be applied to any type of mining device if needed.   The way ASICBOOST works is difficult to explain without getting too technical. It is safe to say the technology allows miners to reduce the number of potential hashes required to solve a network block, resulting in increased efficiency. This results in making mining more profitable for anyone who has access to this technology in the first place. Not only does ASICBOOST improve the dollar per second earnings, but it also reduces the energy consumption required to achieve the increased profitability.  However, it is important to note Bitmain’s version of ASICBOOST is not necessarily the same concept as proposed in the whitepaper. Instead, the company’s mining hardware uses a different implementation where it scales to the hardware level. Considering how Bitmain is one of the world’s largest bitcoin mining hardware manufacturers in the world, the fact that it uses ASICBOOST means the new solution is an important technology. This technology has gotten a lot of negative attention these past few days due to a post by Gregory Maxwell. He claims someone has successfully reverse engineered one of Bitmain’s ASIC miners. To be more precise, some people claim scaling solutions such as Segregated Witness will invalidate the use of ASICBOOST altogether. However, according to Sam Cole, owner of KnCMiner: Furthermore, Bitmain went on to point out how they also hold a patent for ASICBOOST and that they can legally use it in their cloud mining platforms. However, they claim that they haven’t used the feature so far and are not planning to utilize it “for the greater good of Bitcoin”. If you liked this article, follow us on Twitter @themerklenews and make sure to subscribe to our newsletter to receive the latest bitcoin, cryptocurrency, and technology news.
  7. Internet Settings/APN Settings/MMS Settings/Carrier Frequencies When you use an unlocked phone on a carrier overseas the phone and texting will work right off the bat, but internet and picture messaging won’t. To get them to work (or to get them to work well), you need to input the appropriate APN settings into the device so it knows how to access the internet. Also phones and carriers have different 3G and 4G frequencies that they run on so you need to know what frequency your phone uses for 3G/4G and what the carrier uses as well. We’ve taken the time to list the 3G or 4G frequency for each of the carriers below to help make it easier for you. All you need to do is find what frequencies your phone runs on. To do that, head to our Device Specs section and search for your device at the top right. Once it brings up your device’s specs, simply look for the 3G and 4G frequencies listed and take note of them to make sure they match that carrier’s frequencies below. Here we have compiled a list of our favorite GSM carriers around the world and their best internet settings and MMS settings.  Any section that is blank, please leave blank or leave the default value that the device automatically put in it. Let us know how these worked for you or if you have better settings for a carrier or settings for a carrier we don’t have by using the contact us form on the right or bottom of this page. Curious what these settings are for? Check out our complete guide for using your phone overseas. Here is how to input the below APN settings for each of the major mobile operating systems: Android (4.2.1) Pull down the notification shade. Select the button at the top right to be taken to the quick options menu. Select Settings at the top right. Select More. Select Mobile Networks. Select Access Point Names. Tap the three dots at the bottom right and select New APN. Enter the information for each field for the carrier you are using from the list of settings below. When you’ve entered everything, tap the three dots in the bottom right corner and select Save. Now tap the empty dot to the right of the new APN to select it. Wait 2 mins and then try to access a website from your internet browser. iPhone/iOS: Open Settings. Select General. Select Cellular. Select Cellular Data Network. Turn ON Mobile Data if it is off. Select APN. Enter the information for each field for the carrier you are using from the list of settings below. Hit the Home button. Wait 2 mins and then try to access a website from your internet browser. Windows Phone: Tap Settings. Select Cellular. Select Add Internet APN. Enter the information for each field for the carrier you are using from the list of settings below. Wait 2 mins and then try to access a website from your internet browser. Internet Settings/APN Settings/MMS Settings/Carrier Frequencies Australia Optus – 3G Frequency – 900mhz/2100mhz Name: Optus Internet APN: yesinternet Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.optus.com.au:8002/ MMS Proxy: 61.88.190.10 MMS Port: 8070 MCC: 505 MNC: 02 Authentication Type: PAP APN Type: default,supl,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Telstra – 3G Frequency – 850mhz/2100mhz Name: Telstra Internet APN: telstra.iph Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.telstra.com:8002 MMS Proxy: 10.1.1.180 MMS Port: 80 MCC: 505 MNC: 01 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Three – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: 3 APN: 3services Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.three.net.au:10021/mmsc MMS Proxy: 10.176.57.25 MMS Port: 8799 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Vodafone – 3G Frequency – 850mhz/900mhz/2100mhz Name: Vodafone APN: live.vodafone.com Proxy: 010.202.002.060 Port: 8080 Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://pxt.vodafone.net.au/pxtsend MMS Proxy: 010.202.002.060 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: 505 MNC: 03 Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Virgin – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz 4G Frequency – 1800mhz Name: Virgin Internet APN: VirginInternet Proxy: 202.139.83.152 Port: 8070 Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mms.virginvibe.com.au:8002/ MMS Proxy: 202.139.83.152 MMS Port: 8070 MCC: 505 MNC: 02 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Botswana Mascom – 3G Frequency – None Name: Mascom APN: internet.mascom Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 652 MNC: 01 Authentication Type: APN Type: default APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Canada Rogers – 3G Frequency – 850mhz/1900mhz Name: Rogers APN: rogers-core-appl1.apn Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mms.gprs.rogers.com MMS Proxy: 10.128.1.69 MMS Port: 80 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Rogers (LTE) – 4G Frequency – 1700mhz/2100mhz/2600mhz Name: Rogers APN: LTEMOBILE.APN Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mms.gprs.rogers.com MMS Proxy: 10.128.1.69 MMS Port: 80 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Croatia Bonbon – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: BonBon Internet APN: web.htgprs Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: mms.bonbon.com.hr/servlets/mms MMS Proxy: 010.012.000.004 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: MNC: 1o Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: VIPnet – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: VIPnet Internet APN: gprs0.vipnet.hr Proxy: 212.91.99.91 Port: 8080 Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mms.vipnet.hr/servlets/mms MMS Proxy: 212.91.99.91 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: 219 MNC: 10 Authentication Type: APN Type: default APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Ecuador Movistar – 3G Frequency – 850mhz/1900mhz Name: Movistar APN: internet.movistar.com.ec Proxy: Port: Username: movistar Password: movistar Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Egypt Mobinil – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Mobinil APN: mobinilweb Proxy: Port: Username: movistar Password: movistar Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Ethiopia MTN – 3G Frequency – None Name: MTN APN: etc.com Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Germany T-Mobile – 3G Frequency – 1900mhz/2100mhz Name: T-Mobile APN: internet.t-mobile Proxy: Port: Username: t-mobile Password: tm Server: MMSC: http://mms.t-mobile.de/servlets/mms/ MMS Proxy: 172.28.23.131 MMS Port: 8008 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Ghana MTN – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: MTN APN: internet Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Greece Cosmote – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Cosmote APN: internet Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: India Aircel – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Airtel APN: airtelgprs.com Proxy: 202.56.240.5 Port: Username: guest Password: guest Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: BSNL – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: BSNL Internet APN: bslnnet Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 404 MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: BSNL Internet APN: bslnmms Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://bsnlmmsc.in:8514/ MMS Proxy: 10.210.10.11 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: 404 MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Tata Docomo – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Tata APN: TATA.DOCOMO.INTERNEThvc Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 405 MNC: Authentication Type: none APN Type: internet APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Ireland Meteor – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: Meteor Internet APN: Data.mymeteor.ie Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: Meteor MMS APN: mms.mymeteor.ie Proxy: Port: Username: my Password: wap Server: MMSC: http://mms.mymeteor.ie MMS Proxy: 10.85.85.85 MMS Port: 8799 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: pap APN Roaming Protocol: Jamaica Digicel – 3G Frequency – 900mhz/1800mhz Name: Digicel APN: web.digiceljamaica.com Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 338 MNC: 050 Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Kenya Safaricom – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Safaricom APN: safaricom Proxy: 172.22.2.38 Port: 8080 Username: saf Password: data Server: http://wap.safaricom.com MMSC: http://mms.gprs.safaricom.com MMS Proxy: 172.22.2.38 MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Macedonia VIP Internet – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: VIP Internet APN: vipoperator Proxy: Port: Username: vipoperator Password: vipoperator Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: VIP MMS APN: vipoperator.mms Proxy: Port: Username: vipoperator Password: vipoperator Server: MMSC: http://mms.vipoperator.com.mk MMS Proxy: 78.40.0.1 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Malaysia U Mobile – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: U Mobile APN: my3g Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://10.30.3.11/servlets/mms MMS Proxy: 10.30.5.11 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Nigeria Airtel – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Airtel APN: internet.ng.airtel.com Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: PAP APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: MTN – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: MTN APN: web.gprs.mtnnigeria.net Proxy: Port: 8080 Username: web Password: web Server: 10.199.212.2 MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: none APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: IPv4 APN Roaming Protocol: Oman Nawras – 3G Frequency – 900/1800mhz You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: Nawras Internet APN: isp.nawras.com.om Proxy: Port: Username: test Password: test Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: Nawras MMS APN: mms.nawras.com.om Proxy: 010.128.240.019 Port: 8080 Username: test Password: test Server: MMSC: http://10.128.240.16/servlets/mms MMS Proxy: 010.128.240.019 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: none APN Type: mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Pakistan Mobilink – 3G Frequency – ? You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: Mobilink Internet APN: connect.mobilinkworld.com Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: Mobilink MMS APN: mms.mobilinkworld.com Proxy: Port: Username: mobilink Password: mobilink Server: MMSC: http://mms MMS Proxy: 172.025.020.012:8080 MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Telenor – 3G Frequency – ? You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: Telenor Internet APN: wap Proxy: Port: Username: Telenor Password: Telenor Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: Telenor MMS APN: mms Proxy: Port: Username: Telenor Password: Telenor Server: MMSC: http://mmstelenor MMS Proxy: 172.18.19.11 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Ufone – 3G Frequency – ? You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: Ufone Internet APN: ufone.internet (or ufone.pinternet for prepaid plans) Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: Ufone MMS APN: ufone.mms (or ufone.pmms for prepaid plans) Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://www.ufonemms.com:80/ MMS Proxy: 172.16.13.27 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Warid – 3G Frequency – ? You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: Warid Internet APN: warid Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: Warid MMS APN: mms.warid Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://10.4.0.132/servlets/mms MMS Proxy: 10.4.2.1:8080 MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Zong – 3G Frequency – ? You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: Zong Internet APN: zonginternet Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: Zong MMS APN: zongmms Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://10.81.6.11:8080 MMS Proxy: 10.81.6.33 MMS Port: 8000 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Puerto Rico Solavei – 3G Frequency – 850/1900mhz Name: Solavei APN: solavei Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://solavei.mmsmvno.com/mms/wapenc MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: none APN Type: default,supl,admin,mms,hipri APN Protocol: IPv4 APN Roaming Protocol: Philippines Globe – 3G Frequency – 850/2100mhz Name: Globe APN: internet.globe.com.ph Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: mms MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Smart – 3G Frequency – 850/2100mhz Name: Smart APN: internet Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: mms MMS Proxy: 10.102.61.46 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: 515 MNC: 03 Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Sun – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: Sun Internet APN: minternet Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 515 MNC: 03 Authentication Type: PAP APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: Sun MMS APN: mms Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmscenter.suncellular.com.ph MMS Proxy: 202.138.159.78 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: 515 MNC: 03 Authentication Type: mms APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Senegal Orange – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Orange APN: internet Proxy: Port: 60801 Username: internet Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 608 MNC: 01 Authentication Type: none APN Type: default,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: South Africa Cell C – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz 4G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Cell C APN: internet Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://MMS.cmobile.co.za MMS Proxy: 196.31.116.250 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Vodacom – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz 4G Frequency – 1800mhz Name: Vodacom APN: iphone.vodacom.za Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.vodacom4me.co.za MMS Proxy: 196.006.128.013 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Switzerland Sunrise – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Sunrise APN: internet Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.sunrise.ch MMS Proxy: 212.35.34.75 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Syria Syriatel – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Syriatel APN: net.syriatel.com Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Tanzania TrueMove H – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Vodacom APN: internet Proxy: Port: Username: true Password: true Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: internet APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Thailand TrueMove H – 3G Frequency – 850mhz You must add both of the below APNs separately to get internet and MMS. Name: TrueMove H Internet APN: internet Proxy: Port: Username: true Password: true Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 520 MNC: 00 Authentication Type: APN Type: internet APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Name: TrueMove H MMS APN: hmms Proxy: 010.004.007.039 Port: Username: true Password: true Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: http://mms.trueh.com:8002/ MMS Port: 8080 MCC: 520 MNC: 00 Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: United Kingdom Vodafone – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Vodafone APN: wap.vodafone.co.uk Proxy: Port: Username: wap Password: wap Server: MMSC: http://mms.vodafone.co.uk/servlets/mms MMS Proxy: 212.183.137.012 MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: GiffGaff – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: GiffGaff APN: giffgaff.com Proxy: 193.113.200.195 Port: 080 Username: giffgaff Password: password Server: http://mmsc.mediamessaging.co.uk:8002 MMSC: http://mmsc.mediamessaging.co.uk MMS Proxy: 193.113.200.195 MMS Port: 8080 MCC: 234 MNC: 10 Authentication Type: PAP APN Type: default APN Protocol: IPv4 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4 United States AirVoice – 3G Frequency – 850mhz/1900mhz 4G Frequency – 700mhz/1700mhz/2100mhz Name: AirVoice APN: att.mvno Proxy: 66.209.11.33 Port: 80 Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.cingular.com MMS Proxy: 66.209.11.33 MMS Port: 80 MCC: 310 MNC: 410 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,admin,fota,mms,supl,hipri APN Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 AT&T – 3G Frequency – 850mhz/1900mhz 4G Frequency – 700mhz/1700mhz/2100mhz Name: AT&T APN: pta Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.mobile.att.net/ MMS Proxy: proxy.mobile.att.net MMS Port: 80 MCC: 310 MNC: 410 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,admin,fota,mms,supl,hipri APN Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 GoSmart Mobile – 3G Frequency – 1700mhz 4G Frequency – 1700mhz/2100mhz Name: GoSmart APN: multibrand Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://gsmt.mmsmvno.com/mms/wapenc MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 310 MNC: 260 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl,mms APN Protocol: IPv4 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4 iWireless (Internet)- 3G Frequency – 1700mhz 4G Frequency – 1700mhz/2100mhz Name: iWireless APN: i2.iwireless.com Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 310 MNC: 410 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl APN Protocol: IPv4 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4 iWireless (MMS)- 3G Frequency – 1700mhz 4G Frequency – 1700mhz/2100mhz Name: iWireless APN: wap9.iwireless.com Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.iwireless.datonair.net:6672 MMS Proxy: 209.004.229.032 MMS Port: 9201 MCC: 310 MNC: 410 Authentication Type: APN Type: mms APN Protocol: IPv4 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4 Net 10 – 3G Frequency – 850mhz/1900mhz 4G Frequency – 700mhz/1700mhz/2100mhz Name: Net10 APN: wap.tracfone Proxy: Port: 8080 Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mms.tracfone.com/ MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 310 MNC: 410 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,admin,mms APN Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 PureTalk – 3G Frequency – 850mhz/1900mhz Name: PureTalk APN: att.mvno Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.cingular.com MMS Proxy: proxy.mvno.telrite.com MMS Port: 80 MCC: 310 MNC: 410 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Simple Mobile – 3G Frequency – 1700mhz 4G Frequency – 1700mhz/2100mhz Name: Simple Mobile APN: simple Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://smpl.mms.msg.eng.t-mobile.com/mms/wapenc MMS Proxy: proxy.mobile.att.net MMS Port: 80 MCC: 310 MNC: 260 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl,mms,admin APN Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 Straight Talk – 3G Frequency – 850mhz/1900mhz 4G Frequency – 700mhz/1700mhz/2100mhz Name: Straight Talk APN: pta Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mmsc.mobile.att.net/ MMS Proxy: proxy.mobile.att.net MMS Port: 80 MCC: 310 MNC: 410 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,admin,fota,mms,supl,hipri APN Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 T-Mobile – 3G Frequency – 1700mhz 4G Frequency – 1700mhz/2100mhz Name: T-Mobile APN: epc.tmobile.com Proxy: Port: Username: Password: Server: MMSC: http://mms.msg.eng.t-mobile.com/mms/wapenc MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 310 MNC: 260 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl,admin,dun,mms APN Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 APN Roaming Protocol: IPv4/IPv6 Verizon (CDMA carrier; will not work with GSM phones) – 3G Frequency – 1700mhz Name: Verizon APN: vzwinternet Proxy: Port: Username: [yourmobilenumber]@vzw3g.com Password: vzw Server: MMSC: http://mms.vtext.com/servlets/mms MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: 310 MNC: 012 Authentication Type: APN Type: default,supl,admin,dun,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Vietnam Vinaphone – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Vinaphone APN: m-world Proxy: Port: Username: mms Password: mms Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol: Mobifone – 3G Frequency – 2100mhz Name: Mobifone APN: m-wap Proxy: Port: Username: mms Password: mms Server: MMSC: MMS Proxy: MMS Port: MCC: MNC: Authentication Type: APN Type: default,mms APN Protocol: APN Roaming Protocol:
  8.       Requirements: Android OS 4.0.3 and upWIBR+ is advanced application for testing of security of the WPA/WPA2 PSK WiFi networks. This application is NOT FAKE, it really works and it is possible to access the WiFi network if it uses weak password.This app supports queueing, custom dictionaries, bruteforce generator and advanced monitoring! Read whole description before buying and please READ FAQ at end of this page.CONTACT ME BEFORE GIVING BAD REVIEW, SO I CAN HELP YOU.The application supports two types of test:– Dictionary test – it tries passwords from predefined list one by one. Please don’t be disappointed if the password will not be found, it simply means that it was not in the dictionary. However, if somebody set his key to “12345678” or “password” it will be detected. This version supports importing of your own dictionaries, so you are no longer limited by pre-installed dictionaries!– Bruteforce test – you can select alphabet, lenght of password and the app will try all combinations of characters in the alphabet. Of course this is complete madness because the number of combinations is growing exponentially with password length. Therefore the app supports custom alphabet and custom mask. If you know that the password is something like hacker and two digits you can set mask to hacker[x][x] and select the digits alphabet. The app will try all passwords like hacker00, hacker01 through hacker99!It’s easy as 1-2-3.1) List available networks and select desired network. WIBR is tested on WPA/WPA2 networks with pre-shared key (PSK). Please note, that the testing will be unreliable if the signal is weak! WARNING: HACKING SOMEBODY ELSE’S WIFI IS ILLEGAL! USE THIS APP ONLY ON YOUR OWN NETWORKS!2) Select desired dictionaries or set up the bruteforce attack. There are three predefined wordlist which you can use. They contains a list of most commonly used passwords. You can import your own dictionary in txt format, one password per line. Please note, that for WPA passwords the minimum length is 8 characters and shorter passwords will be skipped.3) Wait for results. The process is very slow due to nature of the WiFi connection handling in Android, so be prepared that it can take a loooooooong time. 8 passwords/minute is considered good speed. The wifi have to be enabled all the time, so WIBR is also battery eater!Please note that WIBR will change password for the selected network. It is impossible to get this password back. If you are testing previously saved network then the password will be lost.If you do not want to pay then try the free version: https://play.google.com/store/apps/d…uradesign.wibrPlease, read this FAQ before giving bad review. If the app is not working for you it is certainly some resolvable issue because it is working for many othersFAQQ: The app do not start testing! What should I do?A: When this happens you can try this procedure:– when you was using WIBR Free uninstall it (WIBR Free and WIBR+ may interfere)– update WIBR+ to latest version– restart phone and make sure no other power managers or wifi managers are running– start WIBR+– stop any running scans – click on queue item and then pause it or use the trashbin icon to delete it– add network with good signal (at least 60) and select small dictionary, add it to queue– there should be “Password: 0 of 53”– click on this item to open the monitor and wait at least one minute – it should show some progressIf it still don’t work:– you are trying to test network with weak or unstable signal or in very “noisy” environment (i.e. many networks on same channel)– you are trying to access network which is using so called MAC filtering, so only explicitly allowed devices could access the networkThe solution is to try WIBR+ on another network with good signalWhat’s New1.0.33– fixed occasional crash on exit1.0.32– Still 0 bug finally gone!– App is killed when using exit buttonMethod One: in order to skip license verification first you must be disconnected from internet when you run this app , it will automaticly connects you or turns your wifi onMethod Two: or use lucky patcher for preventing it from license verificationcheck these options in lucky patcherauto mode, other patches, apply patch to delvick cache, back up apk file for reinstallerThis app has NO advertisements Download
  9. Double Driver

      Even if you’re religious about backing up important data, I’ll wager you never thought to back up all your drivers. That’s a worrisome oversight. After all, if your system ever suffers a major meltdown, you’ll need mouse, printer, video, and other drivers to get everything up and running again. And take it from me: driver discs always go missing when you need them the most. Double Driver 4.0 makes fast and easy work of saving all your drivers. The utility scans your system, automatically detects and selects those drivers that aren’t native (i.e. part of the operating system), and lets you back them up to any kind of storage: a USB drive, a network folder, etc. I particularly like the choice of output options. You can save the drivers in a structured folder (meaning each driver gets its own sub-folder), a compressed folder (good if you’re saving to, say, a space-challenged flash drive), or a self-executable file (which will automatically restore every driver when you run it). Double Driver also lets you print a list of your installed drivers and/or save the list as a text file. Both could come in mighty handy if you ever lose the backup itself. What I like best about Double Driver, apart from it being free, is that it’s a portable application. There’s nothing to install; it can run just as easily from a flash drive as it can from your desktop. Ultimately, this is one of those must-have (and must-use) utilities. Take three minutes and make a driver backup. The system you save could be your own. Note: This program is donationware. It is free to try, but the author accepts and encourages donations towards further development.
  10. Router Scan

      Router Scan is able to find and identify a variety of devices from a large number of known routers / router, and most importantly – to pull out of them useful information, in particular the characteristics of the wireless network: a way to protect the access point (encryption), access point name (SSID) and key access point (passphrase). Also receives information about the WAN connection (useful when scanning the local network) and outputs the make and model of the router. Getting information occurs in two possible ways: the program will try to pick up a couple login / password to the router from a list of standard passwords, resulting in a gain access. Or will be used non-destructive vulnerability (or bugs) for the router model, allowing to obtain the necessary information and / or to bypass the authorization process. Router Scan v2.47.7z
  11. Configuring pfSense as a VPN Client to Private Internet Access(PIA) is relatively easy. However, there are a few things to watch out for, especially after pfSense version 2.1.1. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how. There are a few other tutorials available around the internet, but I feel that some are severely inaccurate or missing a couple key steps. When I was configuring my setup, I could not find a single tutorial that was complete and accurate. As a result, I had to piecemeal everything together to get it to work. Additionally, pfSense changed some of the code in version 2.1.1 with regards to Outbound NAT rules to OpenVPN interfaces. Beforehand, things were a bit easier. But starting with version 2.1.1, there are additional configuration settings that need to be set. It’s not that big of a deal. Before it was automatic. Now it’s manually configured. Anyway, I am going to break this down into a step-by-step process without any explanation along the way. Then afterwards, I’ll do my best to explain a few details and to highlight what change was made in pfSense 2.1.1. This tutorial assumes the following: You have a current subscription to Private Internet Access with a valid username and password. You are using pfSense version 2.1.1 or newer You have pfSense setup and configured as a base installation with a single WAN interface connected to a modem and a single LAN interface with one or more clients. Firewall LAN rules have a default “Allow All”. (I know that this is not best practice, but after following this tutorial, you can then revise your firewall LAN rules accordingly.) Also note that I will be referencing Private Internet Access as PIA throughout the tutorial. Getting Started We need to acquire a few things first. Start by downloading openvpn.zip from Private Internet Access. This supplies their ca.crt file and .ovpn files, which include the names of their servers. You won’t be using any of the .opvn files directly, but you can view them in a text editor to get the name of a specific server you want to connect to. Additionally, you’ll need your username and password, which were provided to you by PIA. We’ll be using these later. Next, log into your pfSense administration panel. Now let’s go through the following steps in greater detail: Create CA Certificate Create password file to store your PIA username and password Create/configure an OpenVPN Client Create/configure an OpenVPN interface Configure Outbound NAT rules Verify OpenVPN Service Create CA Certificate Select menu item: System->Cert Manager Select CAs tab Click Plus symbol to add CA Certificate Configure as follows: Descriptive name = PIAVPN Method = Import an existing Certificate Authority Certificate data = (copy/paste your ca.crt certificate provided by PIA) —–BEGIN CERTIFICATE—– . . . —–END CERTIFICATE—– Certificate Private Key = (leave blank) Serial for next certificate = (leave blank) Click Save Create Password File Select menu: Diagnostics->Edit File Enter the following in the Save/Load from path: /etc/openvpn-password.txt Add the following two lines in the text box, substituting your username and password provided to you by PIA: username password Click the Save button Create OpenVPN Client Select menu: VPN->OpenVPN Select Client tab Click Plus symbol to add client Configure as follows: Disabled = unchecked Server Mode = Peer To Peer (SSL/TLS) Protocol = UDP Device Mode = tun Interface = WAN Local Port  = (leave blank) Server host or address = us-texas.privateinternetaccess.com (or any server you choose that PIA offers) Server Port = 1194 Proxy host or address = (leave blank) Proxy port = (leave blank) Proxy authentication extra options = none Server host name resolution = checked, Infinitely resolve server Description = PIA OpenVPN (or whatever you desire) TLS Authentication = unchecked, Enable authentication of TLS packets Peer Certificate Authority = PIAVPN Client Certificate = webConfigurator default *In use Encryption algorithm = BF-CBC (128-bit) Hardware Crypto = No Hardware Crypto Acceleration IPv4 Tunnel Network = (leave blank) IPv6 Tunnel Network = (leave blank) IPv4 Remote Network/s = (leave blank) IPv6 Remote Network/s = (leave blank) Limit outgoing bandwidth = (leave blank) Compression = checked, Compress tunnel packets using the LZO algorithm Type-of-Service = unchecked Advanced = (enter the following into the text field, one item per line with a semi-colon separating each) auth-user-pass /etc/openvpn-password.txt; verb 5; remote-cert-tls server Click the Save button Create OpenVPN interface Select menu: Interfaces->(assign) Click the Plus button to add new interface. The new interface will be named OPT1with a network port of ovpnc1(). Click on OPT1 to edit the interface Configure as follows: Enabled = checked Description = PIAVPN IPv4 Configuration Type = none IPv6 Configuration Type = none MAC address = (leave blank) MTU = (leave blank) MSS = (leave blank) Block private networks = unchecked Block bogon networks = unchecked Click the Save button On new page, click Apply Changes Configure NAT Rules Select menu: Firewall->NAT Select Outbound tab Check the radio button:  Manual Outbound NAT rule generation (AON – Advanced Outbound NAT) Click the Save button At this point, automatic rules that were in use in  Automatic outbound NAT will be generated. It will look like the following, with the exception that the source IP subnet will match your LAN IP subnet. The next step is to duplicate each of these rules, but change the NAT Address from WAN to PIAVPN. Start with the first rule by clicking the Plus sign immediately to the right of the line “to add a new NAT based on this one.” A new page will open. Configure as follows: Do not NAT = unchecked Interface = PIAVPN Protocol = (do not change) Source = (do not change) Destination = (do not change) Translation = (do not change) No XMLRPC Sync = (no dot change) Description = Auto created rule for ISAKMP – LAN to PIAVPN Click the Save button Repeat this process for the other two rules. When completed, it should resemble the following: Finally, click the Apply Changes button Verify OpenVPN Service At this point, your system is configured. The only thing you may need to do is restart your OpenVPN Service. Select menu: Status->OpenVPN Status should be UP (but it may be DOWN) My recommendation is to click on the Restart OpenVPN Service button no matter what the status is. It’s the middle button to the right of the service. Verify OpenVPN Logs: Select menu: Status->System Logs Click on OpenVPN tab Look for confirmation in your logs: openvpn[65701]: Initialization Sequence Completed A few other observations to make: Select menu: Status->Dashboard   Your PIAVPN interface should be listed under Interfaces and have an IP address. I have found that after initial configuration, you may need to restart the OpenVPN service With a client on the LAN, use a browser and go to ifconfig.me   The IP address stated should be the public IP of PIA’s server, not your WAN IP Explanation Now that we have the VPN up and running, allow me to explain a few things. verb 5; When I setup the OpenVPN client, you will have noticed that I added an advanced directive: verb 5. This advanced setting is simply used to increase the verbosity of the OpenVPN log files. This is a personal preference and you can adjust accordingly. However, as I continue to explain a few things, I’ll reference the log files. Without this advanced directive, your log files will differ and you may not see the same logs that I reference. remote-cert-tls; Another advanced directive I configured was: remote-cert-tls. This advanced setting is used to prevent Man-In-The-Middle attacks, and the server needs to be configured properly for this to work, which Private Internet Access servers are. Quoting from OpenVPN manual: --remote-cert-tls client|server Require that peer certificate was signed with an explicit key usage and extended key usage based on RFC3280 TLS rules. This is a useful security option for clients, to ensure that the host they connect to is a designated server. Also from OpenVPN manual: This is an important security precaution to protect against a man-in-the-middle attack where an authorized client attempts to connect to another client by impersonating the server. The attack is easily prevented by having clients verify the server certificate using any one of --remote-cert-tls, --tls-remote, or --tls-verify. Thus, ‘remote-cert-tls server‘ means that the certificate has “TLS Web Server Auth” as an extended property. So when configuring your OpenVPN client with this directive, take a look at your logs. You will see the following lines that validate and verify the certificate. Without this advanced setting, these lines will not be in your logs and this validation is not performed: openvpn[65701]: Validating certificate key usage openvpn[65701]: ++ Certificate has key usage 00a0, expects 00a0 openvpn[65701]: VERIFY KU OK openvpn[65701]: Validating certificate extended key usage openvpn[65701]: ++ Certificate has EKU (str) TLS Web Server Authentication, expects TLS Web Server Authentication openvpn[65701]: VERIFY EKU OK openvpn[65701]: VERIFY OK: depth=0, C=US, ST=OH, L=Columbus, O=Private Internet Access, CN=server, emailAddress=secure@privateinternetaccess.com Routing In some tutorials I found, I was instructed to configure my Firewall LAN rules with an advanced setting to specifically choose my Gateway. I found that this wasn’t necessary be default with a base installation of pfSense. It’s only necessary with more advanced firewall configurations. The following image is how the default firewall rules are for the LAN. Take note of the middle rule for IPv4 protocol. This is the default “Allow All” rule that says that any Source IP with any Port is allowed to go to any Destination IP to any Porton any Gateway. With this rule, the decision of which Gateway(interface) to use, WAN or PIAVPN, is made via the system routing table. Now we can override this so that we force LAN traffic to use a specific gateway. As an example, do the following: Click on the Edit button for this default “Allow All” rule. (The button with lower-case ‘e’ to the right of the rule.) Scroll all the way to the bottom to the Advanced Features section. Click the Advanced button next to Gateway. Change the dropdown box to PIAVPN_VPN4 Click Save. You’ll return to Firewall->Rules->LAN tab. Click the Apply Changes button. Now that this has changed, you’ll see that your OpenVPN Gateway has been specified for this rule, and this means that all LAN traffic bypasses the system routing table and always goes out your OpenVPN interface to the Private Internet Access server. Now I want to point out that we haven’t made the VPN function any differently. All we’ve done is force LAN traffic out the VPN interface instead of having the system routing table make that same decision for us. Why would we want to do this? Well, by creating specific rules for your firewall, you can then force certain clients out the VPN or out the WAN or whatever you want to do. This is just one more tool to allow you to control the firewall exactly how you want. Manual Outbound NAT If you were setting up your own peer-to-peer VPN and you had control of both the VPN Server and VPN Client, then you wouldn’t need to NAT the client-side LAN subnet to the VPN tunnel IP as we’re doing in this tutorial. Instead, you would use routing and NAT on the server to achieve your goal of reaching the internet through the VPN Server. Obviously, we have no control of PIA’s servers. Additionally, PIA doesn’t know the specific subnet we’re using on our LAN so that they can configure their servers to route and NAT our traffic out their public IP. Instead, they route and NAT the VPN tunnel IP, because that’s what they have control over. This is why we have to create an OpenVPN interface, which the VPN tunnel IP attaches to, and NAT our LAN traffic to it. In the end, this is a double-NAT situation, once from LAN-to-VPN-tunnel-IP on the VPN Client, and again from VPN-tunnel-IP-to-public-IP on the VPN Server. As you’ll recall, we configured our Outbound NAT rules manually. These rules are what NATs our LAN subnet to the VPN tunnel IP. But why do we have to manually configure these rules? Why aren’t they automatically created? With versions of pfSense prior to 2.1.1, it wasn’t necessary to manually configure the NAT rules as we’ve done. However, the configuration change from Automatic Outbound NAT to Manual Outbound NAT was still required. It’s just that prior to 2.1.1, the necessary rules you needed to get your LAN subnet NAT’ed to your VPN tunnel IP were automatically created for you when you made this change to Manual Outbound NAT - as odd as that may sound. So you may be wondering, “Why are NAT rules automatically created in Manual mode but not in Automatic mode? Isn’t this a break in logic?” I thought the same, so I posted my questions to the pfSense forum in the hopes of discovering why. The funny thing is, I got my answers, but the end result was a change in code starting with version 2.1.1 which requires manual configuration for Outbound NAT to OpenVPN interfaces. To put it simply, prior to version 2.1.1, Automatic Outbound NAT rules skipped OpenVPN interfaces, yet these interfaces were still considered when automatically creating the first set of manual rules. Starting with version 2.1.1, the code was since been changed so that OpenVPN interfaces are also skipped when automatically creating the first set of manual rules. Here is the bug submission at Redmine if you want further clarification.
  12. Hey, You can set up Pfsense to use certain static IP addresses to connect to different VPN or WAN addresses. I have a openVPN set up locally and one for USA to watch netflix, I have each set up to be used on 10 IP slots, so to change VPN to USA I just change the static IP on the host PC and same with the WAN I can turn VPN off by switching static IP on PC.Create a Alias: To do this first head over to firewall / Aliases. Under IP click the add new alias Then fill in the info like so Name: Name it what ever for example "PIASydneyIP" (can named anything)Description: Not needed. Type: Host(s)Host(s): Click add entry and enter a IP you want to use for the static IP to use for VPN. Click add again to add another. Mine I added 10 IP addresses but you can add only one or how ever many you like. So mine is 192.168.1.130 - 192.168.1.139Then if you want to have several OpenVPN connections IE another to USA like I have repeat the original post to add a new OpenVPN on a different connection. Then repeat the above to set a new range of IP addresses I have 192.168.1.150 - 192.168.1.159 For the USA VPN. Create Pass threw Rule:Now you need to make a rule so that the aliases you set above over rule the WAN rule. So go into Firewall / Rules / LAN.Click Add New Rule. and change these.Protocol: ANYSource: Type in your alias name I made it "PIASydneyIP'Description: Give it a name like "Sydney VPN Passthrew" In advance features change this.Gateway: Your OpenVPN gateway you want to use Now save the rule. Repeat this if you want to set another VPN connection location for different IP addresses. Set Up WAN Addresses:Now you need to set a rule for WAN you could set it to connect to certain IP like the above rules, But I have it using all the rest of the available IP addresses left to do that this is how. In Firewall / Rules / LANadd new rule. change this settings. Protocol: anySource: LAN Net (from drop down box) Description: WAN PassthrewGateway: WAN (from drop down box)Click save. Change the order:Now back in Firewall / Rules you will need to put rearrange the order of the rules. It should but like this (the order of the OpenVPN rules do not matter as long as they are above WAN)LocalVPNUSAVPNWAN Passthrew Any rules left overAs the rules at the top over ride the rules underneath you want the VPN on top then any IP addresses the VPN rules are not using the WAN will use. On your desktop set the static IP like normal but change IP to the connection you want to access. Say I want just VPN I put 192.168.131 and it will be on local VPNSay I want to watch netflix from USA on my TV I change it to 192.168.1.151Say I want to use ISP IP on my tablet to play games I set it to 192.168.1.110Now you can have as many devices you want connected to any of the networks all at the same time and changing VPN connection on the fly on any device is easy just change your static IP. Another advantage of this if the VPN drops out it will not revert back to your WAN connection as its on a separate IP your internet will just fail to load pages so you will know when the VPN drops out. Set up website based fall back to WAN from VPN connection:You can also set a rule to exclude websites to use the VPN so it will bypass the VPN even when your connected to it. I do this with cloudflare as I have been banned from sites using cloudflare while I was on VPN. So I have put a rule in so I dont have to change to WAN when I access them. Here is how to setup for cloudflare but you can add alias like above for several sites if you like but you need to use the sites IP not address. First off go to Aliases / URLs as cloudflare have a text file to add as there is to many addresses to add manually. click add new aliases. Name: CloudFlareIPDescription: can be blankType: URL Table (IPs)URL Table (IPs): https://www.cloudflare.com/ips-v4put in the amount of days you want it to update, I am not sure if they do update it or not but I put 30.You can make your own rule for single sites the same as you made the aliases for the openVPN Go to firewall / Rules / LANAdd New Rule. Change theseProtocols: any Source: LAN Destination: CloudFlareIP (or any other alias you set) Description: ClourFlareBypassGateway: WAN Now save and back on the LAN page make sure this rule is at the very top above the VPN rules To check whether the CloudFlare bypass works go to iplocation.net as it uses CloudFlare. It should show your ISP address then go to https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/pages/whats-my-ip/ and it should show your VPN IP. Change static IP and  check IP again to make sure its all working. Of course if you want only 1 VPN to not use the VPN for CloudFlare sites then change the order. So say we want CloudFlare to bypass LocalVPN but the USAVPN to be a closed VPN with no bypass your order will need to be like this. USAVPNCloudFlareIPLocalVPNWANhope that makes sense I am not real good at explaining things lol
  13. Instructions on how to route all traffic through HideMyAss via OpenVPN   Preparation Please download the keys from https://www.hidemyass.com/vpn-config/keys/ You will need to locate 3 files: ca.crt, hmauser.crt, and hmauser.key. CA Manager Log into your pfSense installation and choose System - Cert Manager Click on the CAs Tab and hit the + button to insert a new CA Type a description (e.g. HMA CA), and paste the contents of the ca.crt file into the Certificate Data field. Then click Save.   Now click on the Certificates tab, click +, type a description (e.g. HMA OVPN), and paste the contents of hmauser.crt into the Certificate Data field, then the contents of hmauser.key into the Private Key Data field. Click Save.     Login File Click Diagnostics - Edit File Type your HMA username and password into the input box, one on it's own individual line. Type /conf/hmauser.conf into the Save/Loadfrom path box, then click Save.   OpenVPN Client Click VPN - OpenVPN Select the Client tab Click the + icon and change the following settings, the rest can remain at the default: Protocol: TCP Server Host or Address: (The IP of the HMA VPN server you utilize, you can find them listed at bottom of each of the following .ovpn config files, http://hidemyass.com/vpn-config/vpn-configs.zip ) Server Port: 443 Check the Infinitely Resolve Server box. Enter a Description (e.g. HMA Pro VPN) UNcheck Enable Authentication of TLS Packets Peer Certificate Authority: HMA CA Client Certificate: HMA OVPN Encryption Algorithm: AES 256 Advanced: verb 3;ns-cert-type server;auth-user-pass /conf/hmauser.conf;persist-key;persist-tun; Click Save Click Status - OpenVPN. The status should be "up" with your IP information listed. It may take 15-30 seconds to establish the connection. Click Status - System Logs - OpenVPN to troubleshoot if the connection does not come up. Check the OpenVPN log for the line: Initialization Sequence Completed. If you do not see this, it means your settings are incorrect. Go back and start again.    Interfaces Click Interfaces - Assign, click the + icon. A new interface should automatically populate with a network port of opvnc1, most likely with a name of OPT1. Click Interfaces - OPT1 Enable the interface by placing a check in the box. Enter a more apt description (e.g. change OPT1 to HMA) Click Save   Firewall Click Firewall - Rules and select the LAN tab Click the e icon to edit your Default Allow LAN to Any rule.   Gateway    Click the Gateway - Advanced button and choose the interface you just created (e.g. HMA) Click Save   If you would like to route only certain LAN IP addresses through HideMyAss via OpenVPN:   Follow the instructions above, but instead of editing the Default Allow LAN to Any Rule, click the + icon to create a new rule. Protocol: Any Source, Type: LAN Address Address: IP of machine you want to route across your HMA VPN connection Description: HMA VPN Rule Gateway: Advanced, choose HMA Click Save Verify the rule you just created is listed ABOVE the Default Allow LAN to Any rule. Rules are processed from top to bottom. If necessary, move the rule to the top.    General Setup Go to the General Setup  Choose WAN for gateway of all DNS Servers. We suggest openDNS (208.67.222.222 + 208.67.220.220) or Google DNS (8.8.8.8 + 8.8.4.4).  Hit Save.   Wait about 5-10 seconds and then check your public IP at http://geoip.hidemyass.com - All your traffic should now be routed through HMA and your public IP should report as your HMA VPN IP, not your ISP's IP.
  14. cryptopia

      Marketplace The Cryptopia marketplace lets you sell anything, to anyone, anywhere in the world in exchange for cryptocurrency. Buy/Sell items free of charge or setup an Auction or classified listing and start using your crypto today.   Mineshaft The Cryptopia Mineshaft is a streamlined and easy to use mining platform for cryptocurrencies. Supports all miners from single CPU or GPU users to full blown ASIC masters.   Exchange The Cryptopia exchange is a quick easy way to convert your crypto. Whether it be for paying bills, buying something from the Cryptopia marketplace or you simply love to collect virtual coins.   https://www.cryptopia.co.nz/Home
  15. Let’s upgrade Windows 10 Home to Windows 10 Pro for free through the Windows App store. Start the upgrade by going to the Windows 10 Pro upgrade page in the Windows App Store. Right below the “$99.99” button click the link “I have a Windows 10 Pro product key”. Enter any publicly posted Windows 10 Pro product, it doesn’t have to be legitimate for this part. (Here’s a freebie! MH37W-N47XK-V7XM9-C7227-GCQG9) Download Microsoft Toolkit from here. Let the upgrade complete and after it reboots make sure your PC does not connect to your WiFi and/or unplug your network cable. Run Microsoft Toolkit, click the windows logo in the lower right of the window and select the “Product Keys” tab.   Microsoft Toolkit Under “Product” select Windows 10 and under “Edition” select Professional. Select the “Enter Custom Key” checkbox and enter a publicly posted Windows 10 Professional Volume License key and press “Install”. (VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T) Microsoft Toolkit Select the “Activation” tab from the top, for “Tool” select AutoKMS and press “Install”. Once AutoKMS installs successfully – select “Activate”. Product activation should complete successfully and you now have a legitimate version of Windows 10 Pro. https://youtu.be/rO4cH0Fb3Cc Microsoft Toolkit.exe